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Sunday, May 26, 2019
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Next CBI chair likely to be Cobra beer founder, Karan Bilimoria 26 May 2:18pm Next CBI chair likely to be Cobra beer founder, Karan Bilimoria
Bilimoria is a vocal remain supporter but says his view is ‘completely separate’ to role The founder of Cobra beer, Lord Karan Bilimoria, is being lined up to be the next president of the CBI at a crucial time for the business lobby group as Britain prepares to leave the EU.
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Fiat Chrysler and Renault expected to announce tie-up talks 26 May 11:21am Fiat Chrysler and Renault expected to announce tie-up talks
Renault board reportedly plans to go public with partnership after a meeting on Monday morning Fiat Chrysler and Renault are expected to announce on Monday that they are in talks on a potential tie-up, in a move that could address some of the main weaknesses of both carmakers at a time of transformation for the sector. The board of Renault is planning to go public with the partnership after a meeting in the morning to discuss the deal, according to reports.
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Brexit will not save troubled steel industry, says trade body 26 May 10:02am Brexit will not save troubled steel industry, says trade body
UK Steel’s director general warns leaving EU will not give steel greater trading opportunities The trade body for steelmakers has rubbished claims that British Steel
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Swedish embassy tours UK by bus to give reassurance over Brexit 26 May 9:34am Swedish embassy tours UK by bus to give reassurance over Brexit
Ambassador aims to address concerns of Swedish businesses and Swedes living in Britain Sweden is embarking on
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Jamie Oliver gave us our big break in the kitchen – and he’s still our hero 26 May 5:00am Jamie Oliver gave us our big break in the kitchen – and he’s still our hero
Jobs are at risk as his restaurant chain collapses, but one group won’t hear a word against him. Apprentices from the Fifteen project say they will always back their mentorWhen, in 2002, Jamie Oliver launched Fifteen, a not-for-profit restaurant designed to train up 15 disadvantaged, young, unemployed candidates into chefs, few expected it would be a success. The initiative was broadcast as a Channel 4 series –
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Driverless Metro: trains and doors get stuck after Berejiklian unveils $7.3bn project 26 May 2:52am Driverless Metro: trains and doors get stuck after Berejiklian unveils $7.3bn project
Trains stuck at Macquarie University and Macquarie Park, where doors failed to open on one train About 42,000 commuters have used Sydney’s new driverless northwest Metro in its first three hours of operation after it was officially opened on Sunday morning. But users took to Twitter to report large crowds at Chatswood station, trains stuck at Macquarie University and Macquarie Park stations, as well as service gaps at numerous stations.
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Culture shock for ‘big yoghurt’ as foodies switch to DIY 26 May 2:00am Culture shock for ‘big yoghurt’ as foodies switch to DIY
Commercial sales dip but environmental concerns make home yoghurt kits a growth area Sue Reed, who lives in Northumberland and runs a business knitting with recycled wool, has been making her own yoghurt for years. “We’ve been trying to live sustainably and frugally for a long time. We grow our own veg, try not to use supermarkets and were eating seasonally before it all became zeitgeisty,” she says. “You could say we’re hippies in the hills, but it really is so much cheaper and tastier to make your own yoghurt.” Reed is not alone. Store chains John Lewis and Lakeland both report a rise in sales of yoghurt-making products, and online retailer
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Elon Musk may be a pain, but that doesn’t mean his ideas are crazy | John Naughton 26 May 2:00am Elon Musk may be a pain, but that doesn’t mean his ideas are crazy | John Naughton
Could Tesla owners one day farm out their cars as self-driving taxis? You don’t have to be a psychiatrist to wonder if Elon Musk, the founder of Tesla, is off his rocker. I mean to say, how many leaders of US public companies get into trouble
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FirstGroup’s uncomfortable rail journey isn’t over yet 26 May 1:59am FirstGroup’s uncomfortable rail journey isn’t over yet
As it prepares to announce annual results, the transport group is resisting pressure from its biggest investor to quit the sectorWith shareholders like these, who needs enemies? FirstGroup’s biggest investor, Coast Capital, has pulled no punches in assessing the board of the Aberdeen-based transport firm. The great five-year turnaround plan has “failed to deliver on every single metric ... They have destroyed extraordinary amounts of capital in the rail business with impunity. They have let down their customers, shareholders and staff.” Yes, they let the school down, they let themselves down, and most of all, they let the share price down.
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Bon vivant Philip Green can do more to plug Arcadia’s pension hole 26 May 1:59am Bon vivant Philip Green can do more to plug Arcadia’s pension hole
If the regulator wants to do its job properly it should start by asking the retail tycoon for at least £250m upfrontThe 222-page document in which Sir Philip Green sets out how he would like to restructure his – or, rather, his wife’s – Arcadia empire is a dense read. You will find enormous detail on which stores the group would like to close, where it would like landlords to accept cuts in rent, and how sales have declined at the Topshop-to-Miss Selfridge business. But two facts tower over everything. Neither is mentioned in the so-called company voluntary arrangement (CVA) proposal but both will be familiar to anyone who has followed Green’s career. First, the family
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Mix private equity, Brexit mania, state incompetence and what do you get? Scunthorpe | Will Hutton 26 May 12:59am Mix private equity, Brexit mania, state incompetence and what do you get? Scunthorpe | Will Hutton
British Steel’s collapse reveals the common fate of industries left to fall into the hands of private equity Across the Midlands and north of England – and in pockets of the south – there are once proud single-industry towns laid low, with no determined effort to make good what once was. It could be Chatham and Rochester in Kent – or Birkenhead, Wigan or Mansfield further north. They survive as economies in which the main business is providing the foundational goods and services necessary to get by – supermarkets, petrol stations, hospitals, care homes. But there are few thriving private sector companies in 21st-century industries, a paucity of opportunity, and wages are below the national average.
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